Recent Changes

Thursday, June 18

  1. 6:55 am

Monday, January 14

  1. page Operation Breakthrough projects edited ... Activity Book: Ages 3-5 years {Activity Notebook.docx} Toe Walking Booklet {Toe Walking I…
    ...
    Activity Book: Ages 3-5 years
    {Activity Notebook.docx}
    Toe Walking Booklet
    {Toe Walking Information Binder.docx}
    {ToeWalking_Handout.docx}

    (view changes)
    4:52 pm

Sunday, December 9

  1. page Operation Breakthrough projects edited ... Activity Book: Ages 12-24 months {PEDS project.docx} Activity Book: Ages 3-5 years {Activ…
    ...
    Activity Book: Ages 12-24 months
    {PEDS project.docx}
    Activity Book: Ages 3-5 years
    {Activity Notebook.docx}

    (view changes)
    7:49 pm
  2. 7:49 pm

Friday, December 7

  1. page Operation Breakthrough projects edited ... Gross Motor/Fine Motor/Balance Activities {OB Project.docx} Activity Book: Ages 12-24 mont…
    ...
    Gross Motor/Fine Motor/Balance Activities
    {OB Project.docx}
    Activity Book: Ages 12-24 months
    {PEDS project.docx}

    (view changes)
    12:09 pm
  2. 12:09 pm
  3. page Pediatric PT Interventions edited Choose one of the intervention strategies you listed in the PCRT for Austin and/or included in your…
    Choose one of the intervention strategies you listed in the PCRT for Austin and/or included in your home exercise program. Post an item (link, handout, photo, video, etc) on this page that describes, illustrates, or demonstrates that intervention. Be sure to post your own written description/explanation with the item. Then also post a link to your item or post on our class Facebook Group. This item may be created by you or someone else, but please remember it should be of good quality, applicable to the case, within the scope of pediatric PT practice, and unique (it may not be posted by more than one student).
    LondonAdaptive Martial Arts Activities
    CRooney: While brainstorming treatment ideas for Austin, I kept thinking back to an experience I had early on in PT school and how beneficial it seemed to be for children not only with cerebral palsy, but also with other neurological, motor, or intellectual disabilities. It sounds crazy, but I observed and volunteered in an adaptive martial arts facility. This specific facility taught American karate, but after doing some research I found several schools nationwide that taught a variety of martial arts disciplines. I thought I could implement a few of the core stability strategies with Austin. The school I volunteered at was initiated by an R.N., and I was amazed at the improvements I saw some of the kids make just over the one- month span I observed through. There were several children with CP that were students there. Two that I remember walked with loft-strand crutches as primary mobility, and one that was highly dependent but able to maneuver a power wheelchair fairly well. They did all kinds of activities these kids, but one that stuck out to me as interesting, fun, and that seemed to be successful involved a sort of “wrestling” (I don’t know what it would be called in karate language). The instructors used either small noodles or rods, as well as their body weight for this exercise. The more dependent child was placed supine for the activity, but the other two children were able to do the activity in sitting and half kneeling. Below is a video of what it sort of looked like for the child who was wheelchair bound. Based on feedback from his mother, her son’s UE strength and ability to hold his posture upright in his chair had improved quite a bit since beginning this intervention. On the first day I was observing, this child’s PT was actually at his class educating the karate instructors on how to transfer him to the mat, and learning some of the karate techniques so she could apply them on occasion. I thought it was really cool how the PT was willing to collaborate with her patient’s family and karate instructors. I think that some martial arts like activity would be beneficial for Austin to promote core stability, strength and endurance training, as well as weight-bearing in quadruped and other positions, which could help manage his spasticity. Since Austin is motivated to participate in adaptive sports, adaptive martial arts could be a great option for him to be involved in the community if he had access to such a facility. The children at this facility were always smiling, and the exercises helped improve their strength and function, taught them means for protecting themselves, improved their self-esteem, and taught them discipline. Here is a documentary on the facility I observed at, if you are interested. Dr. Gupta mentioned C.H.A.M.P.S. during his lecture as well.
    {http://kyokuten.net/uploaded_files/pics/articles/Karate-Stances.JPG} London
    Bridges Falling
    CTeague(Abbott): I wanted to focus on strengthening Austin's gluteal/hip muscles to improve his postural stability with the ultimate goal to increase walking efficiency and safety. For this exercise I would have Austin lying on his back on a firm/solid surface. I would instruct him to lift his hips as high as he can towards the ceiling so that he would be performing a bridge. Initially he will most likely need manual assistance to perform this exercise, but the goal would be to gradually take away this support. Since Austin is in kindergarden, a way to make this exercise more like a game I would instruct the teacher to play the song "London Bridges Falling Down". The entire class could perform this exercise with key words that would cue them to go up in a bridge position and key words that would cue them to go down. The total length of this song is about 2 minutes, so they could progress the amount of time spent in the bridge position.
    {http://www.namastekid.com/assets/photos/bridge-pose_x260.jpg}
    (view changes)
    10:46 am

More